Psychogeography Special: Weird Wiltshire Nov 23rd


23rd November 2017
8:00 pm

Latest Music Bar
Brighton

Tickets
£ 7.00

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Catalyst Psychogeography Special: Weird Wiltshire
Nov 23rd 8pm £7

With guest speakers Mike Pringle & Hilda Sheehan (all the way from Swindon!)
Plus David Bramwell

Wiltshire, home of Stone Henge, Silbury Hill, Avebury and Julian Cope, has every right to be considered weird. It was also the location for the most unsettling children’s TV series ever made: Children of the Stones, and home to Victorian nature writer, Richard Jefferies, known as ‘Wiltshire’s prose poet of the hills and vales’.
Referring to Jefferies observations, Mike Pringle and Hilda Sheehan will explore the millennia recorded so solidly in the lumps, bumps, and megaliths of Wiltshire’s ancient landscape. They show how, even today, we can reach back across time through the remnants that the ‘Ancients’ have left us: the landscaped stories, which Jefferies calls ‘records of ancient experience, the experience of a thousand years’.

Born in one of the only houses visible from Stonehenge, Dr Mike Pringle is an artist and historian who has had a lifelong passion for the history and prehistory of Wiltshire.
Hilda Sheehan is a published and established poet and educator. She has extensive experience in bringing history and the arts to life for any audience. The pair also run the Richard Jefferies Museum, Swindon – birthplace of Wiltshire’s prose poet of the hills and vales.

Support comes from Catalyst host David Bramwell, who will explore Avebury, the only village in the world to be found inside a stone circle, with particular focus on the TV series, Children of the Stones, made in 1976.

Catalyst Club December 14th


14th December 2017
8:00 pm

Latest Music Bar
Brighton

Tickets
£ 7.00

Last month we learned about Wojjek, a bear who was a private in the Polish army, the world’s worst orchestra (whose members included Brian Eno on Clarinet and Michael Nyman on sousaphone) and explored some stunning photos for a project called Humans of Greater London. This is our last Catalyst Club of the year so rest assured there’ll be some cracking talks and plenty of festive cheer.

Catalyst Club December 14th


14th December 2017
8:00 pm

Latest Music Bar
Brighton

Tickets
£ 7.00

Last month we learned about Wojjek, a bear who was a private in the Polish army, the world’s worst orchestra (whose members included Brian Eno on Clarinet and Michael Nyman on sousaphone) and explored some stunning photos for a project called Humans of Greater London. This is our last Catalyst Club of the year so rest assured there’ll be some cracking talks and plenty of festive cheer.

Happy Christmas

Dr Bramwell x

The Political Power of Music with Dave Randall Jan 25th


25th January 2018
8:00 pm

Latest Music Bar
Brighton

£ 7.00

Musicians have often wanted to change the world. From underground innovators to pop icons many have believed in the political power of music. Rulers recognise it too. Music has been used to challenge the political and social order – and to prop up the status quo.

Sound System is the story of one musician’s journey to discover what makes music so powerful. Dave Randall uses his insider’s knowledge of the industry to shed light on the secrets of celebrity, commodification and culture. It is a book of raves, riots and revolution and poses the question: how can we make music serve the interests of the many, rather than the few?

Dave Randall is a musician and activist. He has toured the world playing guitar with Faithless, Sinead O’Connor, Emiliana Torrini and many others. In this illustrated talk, he’ll take us on a thrilling trip into the world of music and politics – one that will take us through history and across cultures. We’ll then have a Q&A / discussion and Dave will stick around to chat some more. 

“A deeply intelligent look at music and society. Thought provoking, readable and clever” Mark Radcliffe (BBC 2 / 6Music)

Sound System: The Political Power of Music is a book of raves, riots and revolution. It looks at examples from Beethoven to Beyoncé and poses the question: how can we make music serve the interests of the many, rather than the few?